Book Review: The Difficult Farm

Published March 29, 2013 by pipsqueak
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       (via spdtoday)

Heather Christle’s poems are full of emotion, conveyed in oblique ways involving pioneers and assassination and yelling at forests.

Some of her poems sound like the beautiful babbling observations of an omniscient magical alien. The poems change emotions as unexpectedly as a finicky toddler, so you’re never bored. Christle’s work is mostly very exciting to read, full of novel phrases and shiny metaphors. Some of her poems contains snippets of fairytales, historical references, or bits of dialogue snagged from a stream of conscience. It’s these expertly-joined bits that forge such exquisite little stories.

Dear stupid forest

Dear totally brain-dead forest

Dear beautiful ugly stupid forest

full of nightingales

Why won’t you shut up.

-“Acorn Duly Crushed” by Heather Christle

Heather Christle is a young poet, pretty much free from the norms of traditional poetry.  Not a rhyme scheme or iambic foot in sight anywhere. Her poems are full of vivid, unorthodox ideas and images. However, many of them do have a sort of hypnotic rhythm when read out loud. There’s also something about them that, even though many of the poems are somewhat uncomfortable, seems very humane.

When they say nobody rides horses anymore

what the mean is: look, the ineffable sadness

has returned

-“Pale Lemon Square” by Heather Christle

I’m not really sure how to describe Christle’s poetry. It’s zingy, it’s full of surprises. Every poem contains 2-4 phrases that will make you feel strong emotions. Go read it.

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